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August 19th, 2014 at 4:43 pm

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies for One

in: Cooking

I love oatmeal cookies. Usually I follow a recipe by Ina Garten, splitting the recipe in half to get about a dozen c
cookies. This recipe from Cooking Classy is similar and claims to make one cookie. However, after preparing the dough as directed, there was clearly enough for two cookies and that is how I am presenting it.

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp. butter
  • 1 Tbsp. whisked egg (see Notes)
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup quick (old fashioned) oats
  • 1/8 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/8 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1/8 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)
  • 2 Tbsp. raisins (or 3 Tbsp. chocalate chips)
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts or pecans

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees (F).
  2. In a small bowl microwave the butter until (almost) fully melted.
  3. Add the egg and vanilla (if used) and stir.
  4. Add the sugar, flour, oats, baking soda, cinnamon and salt.
  5. Stir the (very thick) dough until well blended then mix in the nuts and raisins.
  6. Divide the dough in two, place (as mounds) on a parchment lined baking sheet about two inches apart. Flatten slightly wtih a damp hand.
  7. Bake for 13 – 15 minutes. The edges and bottom should brown, the center will be soft until cooled.
  8. Allow to cool.

Notes

In a larger recipe it is not possible to scale down one egg so just crack the egg in a very small bowl, whisk together the yolk and white then measure out the one Tbsp. required in the recipe.

Instead of light brown sugar use 2 Tbsp. dark brown sugar plus 2 Tbsp. Splenda to save some calories.

 

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August 17th, 2014 at 10:03 pm

Pineapple Cobbler

in: Cooking

The source of this recipe is www.allyou.com. I have not modified it but I do not own a 9-by-13 baking pan and even if I did, I would (and did) cut the recipe in half. For the half recipe I used a small, one quart, casserole dish and an 8 ounce can of Pineapple tidbits. A 9 inch pie plate should work just as well.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 cup sugar (or Splenda)
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 stick (1/4 lb.) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 (20 oz.) can pineapple chunks in juice, drained

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. In a bowl, mix flour, salt, sugar, baking powder, milk and vanilla extract. Stir until smooth, then slowly stir in the melted butter.
  2. Spread the batter evenly in a 9-by-13 baking dish (it will be thin, do not worry) and scatter the pineapple chunks evenly over the batter.
  3. Bake for 25 minutes. The pineapple will sink and the topping will turn golden brown and should spring back when lightly touched.
  4. Allow cobbler to cool, but serve while still warm. Top with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream if desired.

Notes

Cobblers are a great alternative to pies. They are simple to make and do not require advanced cooking skills. This cobbler is a little different in that most will have the dough on top, which sinks into the filling while baking. In this recipe, the fruit sinks into the dough.


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August 16th, 2014 at 4:57 pm

Zucchini Parmesan

in: Cooking

This recipe is adapted from one found on TasteofHome. The original recipe called for 4 zucchini and a can of diced tomatoes. Four zucchini were too much for me and why use canned tomatoes when fresh are in season?

Ingredients

  • 2 medium zucchini, cut into 1/4 inch slices
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 large tomato, diced
  • 1/2 tsp. seasoned salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Italian seasoning
  • 1/8 tsp. (large pinch) black pepper
  • 2 tbsp. grated Parmesan cheese

Directions


  1. In a large skillet, sauté zucchini in oil until crisp-tender (it will brown a little). Add garlic; cook 1 minute longer.
  2. Stir in the tomatoes, Italian seasoning, salt and pepper.
  3. Simmer, uncovered, until the tomatoes start to break down. If the mixture looks a little dry, add 1 or 2 tbsp. of water.
  4. Empty into a serving dish and sprinkle liberally with Parmesan cheese.

 

 

 

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August 15th, 2014 at 11:22 pm

Italian Seasoning

in: Cooking
This blend of dry seasonings will serve you well in any recipe that calls for “Italian” seasoning. I have printed the recipe as I found it (source forgotten). It makes quite a bit of spice and you will probably want to scale it down remembering that one tablespoon equals three teaspoons.
Store in a small jar with a tight fitting lid.
  • 3 tbsp. Basil
  • 3 tbsp. Oregano
  • 3 tbsp. Parsley
  • 1 tbsp. Garlic Powder
  • 1 tsp. Onion Powder
  • 1 tsp. Thyme
  • 1 tsp. Rosemary
  • 1/4 tsp. Black Pepper
  • 1/4 tsp. Red Pepper Flakes

 

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August 15th, 2014 at 3:47 pm

Oven Fried Chicken – I

in: Cooking

 

Ingredients

  • 5 – 6 skinless chicken drumsticks or thighs
  • 1/2 cup plain Panko style bread crumbs
  • 1/2 cup finely crushed corn flakes
  • 2 tbsp. sesame seeds
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. black pepper (freshly ground preferable)
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 tsp. red chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper (optional)
  • 2 tbsp. flour
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tbs. milk
  • 4 tbs. butter, melted

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees (F)
  2. Combine the egg and milk in a shallow bowl and mix with a fork
  3. Combine and mix the remaining dry ingredients except the flour in a second shallow bowl or pie tin
  4. Dry the chicken parts with a paper towel and sprinkle them with flour (Wondra works well)
  5. Dredge the parts first in the egg mixture, then in the seasoned crumb mix
  6. Arrange on a baking sheet or rack and dribble on the melted butter
  7. Bake for 45 – 50 minutes. Thighs (bone in) may require 5 – 10 minutes longer.

Tips

Use a pie tin for the crumb mixture

Save remaining crumb mixture in an airtight container for future use

 Sesame seeds may be toasted if desired. Heat in a dry skillet until tan

Kellog makes pre-crushed flakes. Look in the baking aisle at your grocery store

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January 12th, 2014 at 4:01 pm

Sync Solutions

A common problem is how to share files with friends and family. Small files are easily shared via email but larger files such as videos are often too large to be an email attachment. Cloud services can be used, up to a point, but a user will be charged a monthly fee if his needs exceed the amount of free space offered. If you are like myself, you probably have several cloud accounts, each with it’s own amount of free space. This can get a bit confusing. In this article I will offer two alternatives that will give you a single “personal cloud”.

A company called Connected Desktop has recently introduced a new product called the Transporter Sync. You can read about this gadget on their webpage here. You can buy this device at Amazon for just under $100. It comes with no built-in storage so you must dedicate and attach another USB storage device. I use the word “dedicate” because whatever you attach is reformatted to an unspecified format. If you decide later to swap out that device for another, it will have to be reformatted to a file system recognized by your OS, e.g., NTFS, HFS and etc. The firmware is not quite complete at this time. A “Library” function is yet to be implemented. Without this function all the files/folders on the device are synced with a local or remote computer. It is doubtful that you will want to attach a 1 or 2 TB drive. Connected Desktop promises that the feature is “coming soon” and hopefully “soon” means weeks and not months.

A second solution is offered by the folks at Bittorrent Inc. This FREE software is called Bittorrent Sync and you can download it here. Versions are offered for all popular OS’s. The way this works is that file sharers designate folders on their computers to share. The shared folders are assigned a “secret” key. It’s rather lengthy at 32 characters but you only have to enter it once. Now remote file sharers having folders with identical keys can sync the folders using the bittorrent protocol. Great idea. It’s also a good way to transfer files to and from your local computer and your mobile devices. Of course, unlike the hardware solution offered by Connected Desktop in which the gadget is always online, this method requires that all syncing computers to be online.

Happy Syncing!

Update.

On January 29, Connected Desktop added the much needed “Library” feature to the firmware. The update was automatic with no action needed by the owner other than to have the device online.

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September 22nd, 2013 at 4:10 pm

Portable Wireless Storage

Tim Cook. CEO of Apple, recently predicted that sales of tablet computers would exceed sales of desktop computers by 2015. I believe that he is correct. For travelers, a seven inch tablet can be carried in a large pocket or purse. Try to do that with your laptop or notebook! The challenge is that a typical desktop machine will have a hard drive of 500 GB or more. that’s plenty of room for media. Tablets  have flash storage with capacities of up to 64 GB. Things can get crowded. Certainly a few tablets come with SD slots, but many do not, and none have USB ports. However, external storage for media is available via WiFi gadgets. This article will discuss two such gadgets priced at $100 or less.

First up is the SanDisk Connect Media Drive. It’s available in two capacities, 32GB and 64GB. This little gadget is roughly square measuring less than 3 inches on a side and less than 1/2 inch thick. It has a micro USB port for charging and a standard SD card slot if you need even more capacity. Companion software is avavailable for both Apple and Android at their respective app stores. Here’s how it works. When plugged into a USB port on a PC or Mac, it mounts as a visible drive. Drag and drop documents, songs, and videos to the drive. To view or play them turn on the device and in a few seconds it behaves like a router and broadcasts its SSID. Connect to the network with your tablet, run the companion software and enjoy your media. At least five people can connect simultaneously. The gadget will run for at least 4 to 5 hours on a charge. There is one limitation. Media must be in a format that your tablet can run natively. So, for example. if you have a movie in AVI format you must first convert it to MP4 or H264 on your desktop machine. This is easily done with Handbrake but it takes some time and is a bit of a nuisance.

Next is the HooToo TripMate HT-TM01Portable Travel Router. This gadget is oval shaped, about 4 inches long, 2 inches wide and 3/4 inch thick. It has a dual purpose of being a portable power supply with a capacity of 5200 mah. That’s enough to charge your smartphone or small table one time.It will only charge a full sized iPad to about 25%, enough for about two hours of usage. Like the SanDisk it is charged through a micro USB port. Unlike the SanDisk it has no internal storage but has a regular USB port for network attached storage (NAS). Yes, this a complete router supporting b,g and n protocols. Should you want to change the router characteristics it has an IP address accessible through most web browsers. Use it like the SanDisk. Turn it on and it broadcasts its SSID. Connect to it with your tablet and run the companion software. Unlike the SanDisk your media is on standard USB sticks and your already installed player (that supports streaming) plays the media. For Android users MXPlayer and Dice Player are good choices, Apple users should consider OPLayer or VLC.

Both of these devices are good. IMHO the TripMate has the advantage of not having to convert incompatible formats. There is a work-around for the SanDisk. The device does have the ability to upload files to the tablet. So, providing space is available, you can upload the media, play it on your tablet with your desired player and then delete it. The upload does take some time depending on the size of the file.

If your traveling, don’t hesitate to invest in one of these gadgets.

 

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January 1st, 2013 at 4:27 pm

Advantage: Android

Shortly after its introduction in April 2010, I began to see articles on how one might replace his desktop computer with an iPad. Since then the proliferation of apps has made that possible. Well, not entirely possible on an iPad but it can be done with an Android tablet. In my previous post I pointed out that with their two year head start, iPad apps tend to be more polished than their Android counterparts. This situation is quickly changing. Let’s look at a few things that are easily done on Android that iOS has difficulty with.

First of all there’s the brilliant Android keyboards with word predictions. Entering text with either the SwiftKey or Swype virtual keyboards is nearly as fast as using a physical keyboard. There is no choice of keyboards with iOS. However, a new app called TouchPal provides a similar capability. After entering text within the app, the user copies the text to the iPad’s clipboard. Following this he launches the app where the text is needed and pastes. Clumsy, but it works.

Android has bittorrent apps. You will never see one in the Apple app store.

While you can root your Android tablet there are far fewer advantages than jailbreaking an iPad. An uprooted Android tablet already has access to a complete file system not unlike a desktop machine. There are folders for documents, apps, media, and etc. A desktop user will feel very much at home here. The Android desktop allows widgets some of which extend the capabilities of the operating system.

A desktop Mac has a nice feature called the spotlight that quickly locates and launches apps. Windows users have a similar ability starting with Vista or by using a third party utility like Launchy. iOS has this too but only on the first home screen. It’s annoying to have to return there frequently. Android has an app/widget called Conjure that does the job nicely. Put it anywhere you want. Or put a shortcut to it in the dock.

The dock is another iOS issue. Without installing a jailbreak app, the dock is limited to six shortcuts. The number will vary depending upon which Android launches you choose but in most it’s fair more than six and in some it’s unlimited.

At home I prefer to read news on my iPad. I like Zite and the iOS version is better than the Android one. However, when traveling, I’ll grab the Nexus 7. My laptop sees little use anymore. This post was entered and uploaded from my Nexus 7 using WordPress. The keyboard used was SwiftKey.

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November 6th, 2012 at 7:16 pm

The Android Note Taking Dilemma

For the last two months I have been using both my iPad (3rd generation) and my Nexus 7. I really like the Nexus and I am probably spending more time with that device than with the iPad. It’s smaller, lighter, easier to hold in one hand and has reasonably good screen resolution. Like the iPad it will tun for most of a day on a single charge. I have installed apps for treading ebooks (and PDFs}, calculators, online magazines, a few games and of course noter taking. The dilemma is all about note taking.

Unlike the single simple keyboard with limited features that Apple offers on the various iOS devices, Android allows the installation of third party keyboards. There are many to choose from. Some popular choices are Swype, Swiftkey, and the Perfect Keyboard. These keyboards are provided with special features including, but not limited to, gestures and word completion. With these features enabled text entry can be accomplished  at a very rapid speed that is not possible on Apple iOS devices. The dilemma is that , at this time, there are no really good Android note taking apps that can that are comparable to iOS apps such as Notability, Notes Plus, or my favorite, Note Taker HD. Oh yes, for short, one page notes or simple lists there are some good choices including Handy Notes  and Note Everything,  but for making a draft of a term paper or a blog article like the one you are reading, the available apps are far too limited in features. On the bright side most of these apps are being actively developed and some contain non-functional buttons that only display a message to that effect. Handwrite Pro is a good example. I hope that developer makes the mystery button into an add page feature that is sorely needed in this particular app.

I did find an app called Quill that comes closest to providing a notebook like writing experience. Quill can output handwritten notes to Evernote which can then be printed out from a desktop computer. The app is an open-source project. It’s free if downloaded from the developer’s web site or $1.00 if downloaded from the Google Play store. The downside of this app, as its name implies, is that it solely supports pen and pencil like input with no option for text entry and all the goodness of Android keyboards.

Android has some vey good PDF readers with annotating functions. It occurred to me that if one had a notepad with nothing but blank pages in PDF format than that pad could be opened with a PDF app and all the annotating tools would be available including text boxes and free drawing. It was a good idea except I could not find a way to create multiple blank pages with any Androd app. I was able to do this easily with Note Taker HD on the iPad after which I opened this pad with the Android app Repligo Reader. Admitterly, this was clumsy but it did work and resulted in a pretty good tool. I was able to create text boxes and line diagrams. What’s more they could be resized and moved around the pages.

Originally, I  had planned to draft this article on the Nexus. After an hour or so of frustration I completed the work on an iPad as I usually do. Also, the original intent of this article was too demonstrate that an Android device might be a good choice for a college student. At this time I would be reluctant to make that recommendation but things to change quickly in the computer world. Yes, most of what a student needs is there, but the lack of a really good note taking app could br a serious problem.

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July 13th, 2012 at 3:20 pm

About Clients, Servers and File Sharing (A Review)

Recently a new iPad user asked me how she could get a photo from her computer into her iPad. I could have simply answered that it could be done with iTunes or I could have recommended any one of several iOS apps that would do the job and she could have figured the rest out for herself. On the other hand a more general knowledge of how files are transferred from one computer device to another would be helpful in making choices between applications and understanding how to use them.  In this post I will review the basic concepts of file sharing and transfer between computers.

To accomplish a file transfer one of the computers is assigned the role of a server and the other the role of a client. Each computer will have appropriate server or client software installed. A file transfer from the server to the client is called a download, A transfer from the client to the server is an upload. Generally, files intended to be shared are stored or “hosted” on the server. In this way many devices can be clients to a single server.

The rules and associated syntax that actually accomplish the transfer is called the protocol. In the “early” days before the Internet, the most popular file sharing protocol was FTP (File Transfer Protocol). FTP is still in use today although its usage is declining in favor of more modern and more secure protocols including WebDAV, SSH, and others. To access an FTP server on another computer your device must an FTP client. There are many to choose from and some are both free and cross platform. Examples are  Filezilla and Cyberduck. When the Internet was invented it needed a new protocol to share web pages. Web pages are written in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and the associated protocol is HTTP (Hypertext transfer Protocol).

Today a web browser, that is, a client for HTTP,  comes pre-installed on every computer sold going by such names as Internet Explorer and Safari. iI you don’t happen to like the one provided there are a number to choose from including Firefox, Chrome and Opera. Now wouldn’t it be nice if your favorite web browser could double as a file transfer client? Well that is exactly what a webserver application does! With a webserver app installed and running on your iOS or Android device you enter a URL into the browser’s address field that looks something like this:

http://192.168.1.xxx:8080

where xxx will be a number assigned to the device by your router. Don’t panic, the software figures this all out for you and you simply copy the URL into the browser. Typically, a “drag and drop” interface will appear on your desktop screen. You drop the photo (or other file) onto the interface and it is sent to your mobile device. Two apps that I would reccomend for iOS users are the Photo Transfer App and Air Transfer Pro. Android users should consider WiFi File Transfer Pro. These apps may cost a dollar or two but they are worth every penny.

Another approach is to use a remote server, often referred to as a cloud server. Dropbox is very popular and offers 2 GB of remote storage for FREE which is more than enough for most purposes. Other similar services include box.net, Microsoft SkyDrive, Ubunto One, and others. Dropbox was an early to offer this type of service which partly accounts for its popularity. As such it is integrated into many apps thereby simplifying it’s usage. To use a cloud server the user establishes an account and  acquires a username and password.  Often the username is simply an email address. A free client is installed on both the desktop and mobile devices. Some of the services, including Dropbox, also offer a web interface making the client optional. The user then uploads the photo (or other) file to be transferred from the desktop machine to the remote server. Then the file is downloaded to the mobile device by using the client installed there and (sometimes) performing a “sync” operation. Obviously the use of a cloud server requires an Internet connection and one might not always be available. However, files uploaded to the users “public” area are assigned a public URL accessible by anyone, anywhere. It is undoubtedly the easiest way to share a file with friends.

A client – server relationship will always exist when files are transferred between computers. The methods in which it will be implemented will differ. the “best” method will depend upon individual situations. Having a selection of software tools available and a knowledge of how they work will enable you to make good choices.

 

 

 

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